It's January: Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month has Officially Started with a Spotlight on Lessons Taught by Professional Instructors

 

CONTACT: Mary Jo Tarallo | mjt@learntoskiandsnowboard.org | 202-431-6950

January 2017 – January is officially designated as "Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month" by national, regional and local organizations, resorts and businesses involved in the snow sports industry. This is the ninth year for the initiative that encourages children and adults to learn by taking lessons from trained instructors. The web site for the initiative is www.learntoskiandsnowboard.org.

The month-long celebration starts immediately after New Year’s and continues throughout January with many ski/snowboard resorts throughout the U.S. offering beginner lessons and lesson packages at reduced rates (except for Martin Luther King weekend).

Industry research reveals that most people are introduced to skiing or snowboarding through a friend or family member. The Learn to Ski and Snowboard initiative rewards with product prizes those who help newcomers sign up for professionally-taught lessons through the Bring a Friend Challenge. Beginner also can benefit from prize incentives by posting photos of their first day on the slopes using the hash tag #firstdayfaces.

This year, ski/snowboard areas in the U.S. and Canada are joining forces on Friday, January 6, 2017 in an effort to set a Guinness World Record for the largest ski and the largest snowboard lessons ever taught. Lessons are geared toward beginners.

Eighty U.S. ski and snowboard areas have signed on as host sites. Lessons will take place simultaneously in seven time zones from Alaska to Newfoundland. Start time is 9 a.m. Alaska time; 10 a.m. Pacific time; 11 a.m. Mountain time; 12 noon Central time; 1 p.m. Eastern time; 2 p.m. Atlantic time; and 2:30 p.m. Newfoundland time. The last two times zones are Canada-only. In most locations, lessons consist of a lift ticket, the lesson and rentals.

Many snow sports associations in the U.S., the Canadian Ski Council and Snow Operating are collaborating on the event.

All U.S. host sites are posted on the Learn to Ski and Snowboard web site. The Canadian Ski Council is combining its involvement with its beginner-oriented program called Never Ever Days.

The Guinness Book of World Records requires a significant amount of documentation in order to verify whether or not a record is set, according to Hugh Reynolds, marketing director for Snow Operating and the mastermind behind the event. “We are working diligently with our partners to make sure that we have the documentation necessary to officially set a new record’” he said.

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